Slideshow on the Post Fossil Fuel Economy – Jobs, leisure and innovation

The new slideshow is at http://www.slideshare.net/deirdrekent/steady-state-economy-jobs-for-a-postgrowth-economy. It addresses many of the questions our members have been asking and hopefully makes it easier to understand. There are presenter notes with most slides.

A thriving, vibrant economy is possible after fossil fuels – tax reform, currency reform and welfare reform

http://www.slideshare.net/deirdrekent/sustainable-economics-without-fossil-fuels-21 This slideshare show is now updated and made clearer. It is the first time it has been published on this site and represents a lot of feedback from our members. If others have a method of reforming the tax and money system in a way that is politically possible and in a way that doesn't shock the economy, we would love to know. Meanwhile this is a serious proposal. Feedback is welcomed.

Business encouragement and investment

Business encouragement
With a transformation of the tax system and banking system entrepreneurialism would flourish
The New Economics Party believes that we must be an enterprising nation and that pragmatic and creative business thinking must be encouraged at every level of our society. Our policies are the most business friendly possible. Little will stand in the way of entrepreneurship for those who create a labour intensive business with fair employment policies, good environmental practices and a low carbon footprint. Clean tech innovation can finally occur at full speed. Cooperatives will be encouraged, both workers and consumers cooperatives. The NZ Cooperatives Association would be funded adequately for the purpose.
Farming would  thrive
Farming and other export businesses will thrive because the NZ dollar will drop when the interest rates drop. EECA's (Energy Efficiency and Conservation Authority) funding will be dramatically increased to assist all businesses to be future proofed against energy shocks. Because we will be decentralising banks, it will be possible for them to invest in local businesses, just as the Bank of North Dakota has been able to over many years. Nurturing and mentoring of small and medium sized businesses will be encouraged. Thus local investors will be able with confidence to invest in local enterprises just as in the 1940s and 1950s when Christchurch people invested in firms like Lane Walker Rudkin.